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9211 Visual and Multi-sensory Methods

An increased focus on the visual, material and embodied has been of crucial importance for much of the innovative work done in the humanities and social sciences since the turn of the century. This PhD course will give training in how to do research that takes the role of the visual and the senses seriously. Building on cutting-edge research in method and methodology, the students will gain an overview of recent developments in visual and multi-sensory methods. In that context, students will be given opportunity to focus on a particular sense or range of senses and individually or collaboratively employ methods relevant to working with these senses using equipment such as video/action cams, sound equipment and GPS trackers. We will also address ethical issues, technical challenges and possible ways of representing sensory data in different publication channels.

The course will be given in English and will have a maximum of 12 participants. Changes in the programme may occur.

Dates

2nd, 3rd and 4th October 2017

Registration

Registration deadline: 4th August 2017

How to register: Please complete the following:

  • the registration form
  • a one page statement of interest (in English or a Scandinavian language): why do you want to take this course?
  • Diploma or confirmation of study at the Masters (or equivalent) level (for applicants from outside of the USN system)
  • International students: a copy of your passport

Once you have assembled your documents, please scan and send them to jeanne.m.schoenwandt@usn.no.

Contact

The course’s coordinator is Lars Frers, Department of Culture, Religion and Social Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Sport and Educational Sciences, University College of Southeast Norway, Notodden Campus.

Credits: 5 ECTS

Work load: About 200 work hours

Level: PhD

Semester: Fall 2017

Campus of Instruction: Notodden

Language of instruction: English

Entrance requirements: MA, MS, MFA or equivalent

Course coordinator: Professor Lars Frers, University College of Southeast Norway